Best wine coolers: a buyer’s guide

Every continent in the world is imbued with a history of wine, some dating back to 8000 BC. And while we are not all connoisseurs, it has become a passion for many. Wine is a drink synonymous with class and sophistication and is an important part of food culture. But, while we’re happy to swirl it around in our glasses during festivities, it is in fact a delicate thing and takes skill to cultivate properly. For those with a deep appreciation, a wine cellar would be the ultimate prize. But if that’s not possible, having the best wine cooler available will certainly do the trick. Gaggenau makes some of the slickest, most technically advanced wine coolers in the world – you can see their whole range here. We review their items later on in this article.

How wine coolers work

Storing wine correctly has a direct influence on its taste, aroma and quality. Factors such as temperature, humidity, light and vibration can either maintain it for decades or result in a glass of something dismal.

The purpose of a wine cooler is to keep and age wine in an optimal environment. Digital display functions enable you to adjust the elements inside the cabinet without having to open the door and disturb the ambient temperature within. They also ensure that humidity is maintained at between 60 and 70%, that the wine is protected from UV rays and that the surrounding air is kept clean. The internal racks also make sure that the wines are stored at the correct angle and remain undisturbed.

There are two types of wine coolers available: thermoelectric or compressor-driven.

You will also need to decide whether you would like a single or dual zone unit. Single-zone coolers are better suited to first time wine collectors and provide one set temperature throughout the fridge. Dual or multi-zone coolers enable you to separate your whites from your reds, keeping them at different temperatures.

Wines should be stored as follows:

  • Dry White, Rosé, Sparkling: 45℉
  • Full-Bodied White, Light, Fruit Red: 55℉
  • Full-Bodied Red: 55℉

Best wine coolers: a buyer’s guide

Gaggenau wine cooler review

Gaggenau’s 400 series wine cooling cabinets provide ideal conditions for your wine. Designed for the serious collector, they have the capacity to store up to 99 bottles and offer either two or three independently controllable climate zones, which can be set to ideal storage conditions or at serving temperature.

Stylishly put together, these wine coolers can be ordered with pull-to-open or open-assist UV protected glass doors, framed in a choice of stainless steel or a finish to match your existing kitchen.

Gaggenau’s signature stainless steel interiors are furnished with fully extendable bottle trays made from aluminium and untreated, rounded beech rods, built to protect the labels and showcase your collection in style. Variable humidity levels, glare-free LED lights, a low vibration compressor and an activated charcoal, antimicrobial air filter ensure that your wine remains unharmed.

Gaggenau also offers a variety of cabinet sizes, so fitting them into your space is uncomplicated.

This range also offers:

  • Dynamic cold air distribution
  • Automatic defrosting with defrost water evaporation
  • Cushioned door closing system
  • Open-door and malfunction alarm
  • Integrated WiFi module for digital home connect services
  • Rest mode certified by Star-K

The Gaggenau 400 series wine fridge is an effortless choice if you are a wine aficionado but for first-time collectors, there are simpler options in the Miele range.

Best wine coolers: a buyer’s guide

Gaggenau wine cooler cost calculator 

If you can’t wait to install your very own Gaggenau wine cooler in your house, you’ll need to know what it costs.

Our handy Gaggenau cost calculator will show you how much the wine cooler costs, as well as the prices of other Gaggenau appliances. You can check it out here.

Wine cooler buyer’s guide

Aside from choosing a single or dual-zoned unit, here are the two main considerations you need to make when buying a wine cooler:

Freestanding or built-in

Built-in wine coolers are installed to fit within your existing cabinetry. Freestanding coolers can be placed anywhere including garages and basements.

Thermoelectric or Compressor

Overall, thermoelectric wine coolers are the cheapest, most environmentally-conscious option, but do have to stay on at all times. Their energy-saving system also means that in order to keep temperatures regular, they cannot house more than 24 bottles at a time. Thermoelectric cabinets are silent and emit zero vibrations so wines are protected from movement, but they are sensitive to external weather conditions and may have issues regulating their internal temperature if you live in areas with extreme climate fluctuations.

Compressor based wine coolers are more powerful and can provide a variety of temperature options and greater bottle capacity. So you can grow your collection without having to purchase a second unit. They also maintain a constant internal temperature and are unaffected by changes in the environment. The on and off cycles do create both noise and vibration, but upmarket models come with insulation and padding that minimises these issues. Compression coolers are much more expensive to buy, but as they only switch on when they need to, they do save on monthly electricity bills.

Conclusion

Whichever route you choose to go, if you are mad about wine then a wine cooler is the smart way to keep your collection safe, stable and fashionably on display. For more information and all the best options, view our discerning range of wine fridges here.